WordPress Planet

November 27, 2022

Gutenberg Times: Gutenberg Changelog #76 – The new developer blog’s public beta, Gutenberg 14.5 and 14.6, and what’s coming up in 6.2. 

Ryan Welcher and Birgit Pauli-Haack discuss the new developer blog’s public beta, Gutenberg 14.5 and 14.6, and what’s in the works for the block editor.

Show Notes / Transcript

Show Notes

Connect with Ryan Welcher

Announcements

WordPress Developer Blog

What’s released

Gutenberg Plugin

Documentation

What’s in active development or discussed

Stay in Touch

Transcript

The transcript is in the works.

by Gutenberg Changelog at November 27, 2022 02:58 PM under Gutenberg

November 25, 2022

BuddyPress: BuddyPress 11.0.0-beta2

Hello BuddyPress contributors!

If you haven’t tested our first 11.0.0 beta release, here’s another opportunity to help us give the final touches to our next major release so that we make sure it will fit perfectly into your WordPress / BuddyPress specific configuration. Beta testing is very important and we need you all, whether you’re a regular or advanced user, a theme designer or a plugin author: please contribute!

Please note the plugin is still in development, so we recommend running this beta release on a testing site.

You can test BuddyPress 11.0.0-beta2 in 4 ways :

The current target for final release is December 14, 2022 👈. We would greatly appreciate your help making sure this next major version of your community engine is as good as it can be.

Since beta1, we’ve fixed 12 new tickets and documented some important changes BP Themes or Plugins authors should definitely read:

If you find something weird testing this beta, please report it on BuddyPress Trac or post a reply to this support topic.

by Mathieu Viet at November 25, 2022 10:28 PM under releases

Post Status: WordPress is People (Weekly Community Update)

Yes, of course WordPress is software. It’s code. It’s several different programming languages. It’s blocks. It’s the editor. Yes, it's all of the technology. 

But it’s people. It’s created by people. It’s used by people. It relies on people to move it forward, to modify it, to moderate it, and to build community around it.

John Donne said “No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent.” The same is true about WordPress. Each of us is part of it. WordPress is you and me. It’s us.

If you’re interested in volunteering your time, skills, and resources to the open source project, there are many ways to be involved (and most of them aren’t coding). Learn more about ways to get involved on the WordPress website.

Black Friday/Cyber Monday is here! 

Have you snagged some good deals? (I’ve found a few!) We’ve accumulated over 200 deals on our site. I bet whatever you might need is there. Find this year’s deals here

We have a Black Friday deal, too!

Did someone say Black Friday? We have a deal, too! Get $100 off any level membership. (Gets you Slack access, too!)
USe code: BFCM
Effective 11/25 – 12/31

About Us

Have you ever wondered who it is that makes Post Status work? Look no further than our About Us page to meet the Post Status team: Cory, Lindsey, Michelle, Adam, and Olivia

Upcoming Events:

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Michelle Frechette at November 25, 2022 06:35 PM under WordCamp

November 23, 2022

WPTavern: Dig Into the Open Web

As the American Thanksgiving holiday is coming up, I am so grateful for all of our Tavern readers and the people who make WordPress – 800 in the most recent 6.1 release with 35 percent of them being new contributors. This community has made remarkable progress this year, while navigating changes and uncertain times. Committed contributors continue to show up and make WordPress the best platform for publishing on the web.

The recent social media upheaval with Twitter has been an unexpected gift that has created an opportunity for a mass return to decentralization and open web protocols, like ActivityPub and RSS. The sting of the prospect of losing Twitter followers and the network that users worked to build, has underscored the importance of agency in social networking, the ability to take your data and connections with you to other networks on your own terms.

Although it is somewhat heartbreaking to see Twitter struggling to survive, one silver lining is that this situation is inspiring a drive towards a greater level of interoperability between apps, like Tumblr engineers working to add ActivityPub support so users can connect across Mastodon and other networks that use the same protocol.

People are steadily moving away from the all-powerful algorithms that steer consumers and subtly manipulate the public consciousness, and migrating away in search of healthier, more ethical social networking alternatives. The refreshing lack of ads and algorithms are winning people over in decentralized social networks, which are getting a second look from mainstream publications in light of Twitter’s loss of critical engineering teams.

I’m thankful for this renewed focus on networks that value the open web, where people are now exploring alternatives to walled gardens with their friends, instead of having to start over alone. Never underestimate the power of friction and crisis to refine how we communicate and motivate us to find a better way to stay connected. This is a moment that may have enough traction to change the course of social interaction on the web.

With things changing all around, it’s heartening to know that WordPress is still here and going strong, for those of us who have chosen it as the home for our content. We’re fortunate to have so many plugins available that connect our ecosystem to the broader web, allowing us to syndicate content to almost anywhere. Let’s not miss this opportunity to dig into the open web and see where it takes us.

by Sarah Gooding at November 23, 2022 09:06 PM under News

Post Status: State of the Word 2022 • Dev Blog Beta • WP 3.7 – 4.0 Final Releases

This Week at WordPress.org (November 21, 2022)

As 2022 comes to an end, State of the Word will happen in NYC again. Apply to attend or tune in to the livestream. Check out the beta version of the WordPress Developer Blog. Still have sites on WordPress 3.7 – 4.0? It's really time to upgrade as this will receive no further updates after December 1. It's team rep nomination time too.

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Polyglots

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Support

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Training

Tutorials

Online Workshops

WPTV


Thanks for reading our WP dot .org roundup! Each week we are highlighting the news and discussions coming from the good folks making WordPress possible. If you or your company create products or services that use WordPress, you need to be engaged with them and their work. Be sure to share this resource with your product and project managers.

Are you interested in giving back and contributing your time and skills to WordPress.org? 🙏 Start Here ›

Get our weekly WordPress community news digest — Post Status' Week in Review — covering the WP/Woo news plus significant writing and podcasts. It's also available in our newsletter. 💌

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Build your network. Learn with others. Find your next job — or your next hire. Read the Post Status newsletter. ✉ Listen to podcasts. 🎙 Follow @Post_Status 🐦 and LinkedIn. 💼

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Courtney Robertson at November 23, 2022 06:51 PM under WordPress.org

WPTavern: #52 – Hannah Smith on Why We Need To Be Making Websites More Sustainable

Transcript

[00:00:00] Nathan Wrigley: Welcome to the Jukebox podcast from WP Tavern. My name is Nathan Wrigley.

Jukebox is a podcast which is dedicated to all things WordPress. The people, the events, the plugins, the blocks, the themes, and in this case making websites more sustainable.

If you’d like to subscribe to the podcast, you can do that by searching for WP Tavern in your podcast player of choice, or by going to WPTavern.com forward slash feed forward slash podcast. And you can copy that URL into most podcast players.

If you have a topic that you’d like us to feature on the podcast, well, I’m very keen to hear from you and hopefully get you, or your idea featured on the show. Head to WPTavern.com forward slash contact forward slash jukebox. And use the form there.

So on the podcast today, we have Hannah Smith. Hannah is the operations and training manager for the Green Web Foundation, and founder of The Let’s Green The Web campaign. She’s also co-founder of Green Tech Southwest.

Her background is in computer science. She previously worked as a freelance WordPress developer and also for the Environment Agency, where she managed business change projects.

It’s pretty easy to forget that the device that you’re reading or listening to this podcast on is consuming power. We plug things in or charge them up, and they just work. They are sleek and sterile. No pollution comes out of the device directly. In fact, I’d go as far as to say that many of us never make the connection between our use of technology and the impact that this has on the environment.

Enter Hannah Smith. She’s been thinking about this for years and is on the podcast today to highlight the issue and hopefully get your ideas about what users of WordPress can do to make sure that the websites we create are having the smallest impact possible.

Her approach is not that we need to cease and desist using our technology. Rather it’s about coming up with new and innovative ways that we can reduce the impact that we have.

As creators of websites, there are a whole raft of options available to us. Reducing the size of our images. Inspecting the HTML to remove bloat. Choosing hosting options that source renewable energy.

With this in mind, Hannah and others have been working on a sustainability related blog post, which has been published on the Make WordPress site this week. This post is intended to trigger meaningful and open discussion in the global WordPress community about the topic of sustainability.

She really wants to encourage others to weigh into this public conversation with their own thoughts, so that we can build on what is already happening to make WordPress more sustainable.

It’s a fascinating and thought provoking topic, and if you’re interested in finding out more, you can get all of the links in the show notes by heading over to WPTavern.com forward slash podcast. Where you’ll find all of the other episodes as well.

And so without further delay, I bring you Hannah Smith.

I am joined on the podcast today by Hannah Smith. Hello Hannah.

[00:04:02] Hannah Smith: Hello Nathan. Thank you so much for having me today.

[00:04:05] Nathan Wrigley: You are so welcome. Hannah is here today to talk about the environmental impact of having WordPress websites, and I genuinely think this is going to be a real eye opener for many of us.

Before we do that though Hannah, we always orientate our listeners by allowing the guests to just give us a bit of background on who they are and what their relationship is with WordPress. So if you don’t mind, I’m going to ask you that very generic question is just tell us a little bit about yourself and how come you are into WordPress.

[00:04:35] Hannah Smith: Thank you. I’m a massive fan of WordPress. I’ve so much love and admiration for the community. So my background is as a computer scientist, so that’s what I studied in my degree. Had, like many people, are very sort of winding interesting journey in and around different things.

And about eight years ago, I set myself up as a freelance WordPress developer. So having done sort of other careers within tech, I won’t give you the long winding path that I got there, but serendipity basically somehow landed me, as a freelance WordPress developer. Finding myself wanting to give it a go.

I was living in Bristol at the time, and wanted to learn more about WordPress and found that we had a meetup community in Bristol, and decided to pop along. Was made to feel very welcome, and learn loads from the awesome people there. So, a shout out to Simon, Janice, and Rob, who were the people that grounded me into that community.

And then it wasn’t long before I somehow found myself invited to help run that community and help drive that community, which I was very happy to do for a good few years. And then in 2019 we did WordCamp Bristol. We had about 200 odd people come to that, which was brilliant. And I’ve been quite involved in WordCamps and speaking at conferences. Try and contribute where I can.

These days I’ve actually hung up my shoes, only recently as a WordPress developer, and I’ve transitioned to working full-time for the Green Web Foundation. But part of my role at the Green Web Foundation, so I do a lot of training and outreach and operations, because we’re small, so everyone wears lots of hats.

But I do also manage our WordPress website as well and our WordPress estate too. So, whilst it might not be my full job title to have WordPress every single day, it is still very much a part of what I do.

[00:06:35] Nathan Wrigley: Thank you. What a, rich and interesting history you’ve had. We’ve met in person on a number of occasions, but it’s been a little while since we met up in person. But you came across my radar on the 1st of November because of a piece that you had written over on make.wordpress.org.

I will link to it in the show notes and, it may well be a good idea, if you’re listening to this podcast and you are anywhere near a device, it might be a good idea to pause the podcast actually. Go and read the piece it’s called, now we have a sustainability channel in making WordPress Slack, what should we do?

And the reason I’m asking you to potentially go and read that is because really it’s going to form the basis of everything that we are going to be talking about around the environment and so on. So tell us what was the concern? What was the primary motive for writing that piece?

[00:07:25] Hannah Smith: So, the piece was written very much in collaboration with four others, so I want to say from the outset that whilst it was my face next to the post when you read it, I was the nominated person to publish it. It was very much a collaborative effort with four others.

So with Nora, Nahuai, Pace, and Csaba, who are placed in different places across Europe. And, Nahuai and Nora, I knew from some workshops I’d run back in the spring, exploring the topic of digital sustainability. But we were chatting and we all felt that where was the action in WordPress on sustainability?

We were kind of looking around and, I’m very involved in the wider community around digital sustainability. But I was looking around and I was like, I just don’t feel this in WordPress. It’s just not surfaced enough. It’s very niche and, we are really getting to a point where sustainability can’t be a niche concern.

It has to be a concern for everybody, everywhere because what’s happening around us in terms of the changing climate, in terms of our lack of sustainable approaches, does affect every single person, whether they want to admit that or not. We are all impacted by it. Rich, poor, young, old, we’re all going to face these consequences.

So we were chatting and Nora and Nahuai I were at WordCamp Europe this year, and Nora actually asked a question in, you know the Q and A that Josepha and Matt have? So Nora asked a question about sustainability and stood up. I mean more power to her. She stood up in front of the whole crowd and said, hey, sustainability. We really care about this, but there’s nothing much happening, and Matt and Josepha said, well, okay, look. The very first thing we can do is set up a channel in Slack. So maybe that will help, WordPress Slack. You know to give people a collaboration space and a meeting space.

And they also said, well, and if you’ve got any ideas or specific proposals that you want to make, we are going to listen. The door is open, essentially. So Nora set this ball in motion really with her question. And then Josepha and Matt responded really well. And so since then, since the summer, a few of us have been sort of working, just informally, thinking, okay, well how do we capitalize upon this?

WordPress leadership is saying we’re listening, or, we are happy to collaborate with you. But now what we need to do is to get the community together and to get the community, A, to know who each other are, and B, to acknowledge this is a topic and to talk about it, and discuss it, and bring knowledge and ideas into a space together. So this is why we ended up writing the post. And the post is very much saying, hey, WordPress community, look, we’ve got this channel, but you know, a channel isn’t going to solve our problems.

It’s, it’s you. You and your ideas that are going to solve these problems or that are going to make progress. So, could we please get into a discussion about what people’s ideas are? So we’ve invited people to share their ideas and particularly any vision that they have. Or ideas that they have around what sustainability and WordPress might look like in the future.

Because if we can’t imagine it, we’re not going to get there. And I think a lot of the narrative around climate change is very doom and gloom. It’s very pessimistic. It feels almost like we’re accepting that we’ve been defeated. opposite. It’s so the opposite. We have every opportunity and potential here to turn things around and change things. It is not yet too late. So we wanted to really bring everyone together and imagine these ideas together and then see where that leads us.

[00:11:18] Nathan Wrigley: Thank you. That’s really helpful. You used the word sustainable a dozen times or more in, in that, last little section, and it occurs to me that there’s probably quite a few people listening who have some sort of conception of what we mean by sustainability, but I’m pretty sure that everybody’s conception of it will be slightly different to everybody else’s.

What exactly are you meaning when you say sustainability in WordPress or sustainability surrounding WordPress? What are the areas that you are touching on? What are the points of concern that we need to have drawn to our attention?

[00:11:54] Hannah Smith: Yeah, that’s a great question. You are absolutely right that most people will have slightly differing ideas of sustainability. Some people may even have a very narrow view of sustainability, which might be something called decarbonization. Which really relates around carbon emissions. But, Perhaps let me give a really sort of wide view of what sustainability is outside of the realms of tech or WordPress, and then we can kind of narrow in a bit and talk about how that relates then to tech or digital specifically, or WordPress specifically.

So if we talk about sustainability or the word sustain, it means that we’re able to keep doing things into the long term. There’s this quote that’s often used. It’s about meeting the needs of the present without compromising the needs, or the ability of the future generations to meet their needs. So at it’s most basic level, sustainability can mean that. To get a bit more specific about it, I draw on something called the donor economics framework.

If anybody here is interested in a really holistic way of thinking about sustainability, that’s a bit more in depth, I really recommend this as a resource to have a look at. Very accessible. Don’t let the fact that it’s about economics or economics turn you away, make you think it’s not for you. It is for everybody. And the way that donor economics talks about sustainability, I really love this is, it talks about sustainability as having humanity at the center of the story.

So sustainability is much more than us thinking about the environmental ecosystems. It’s about thinking about how humanity sits within the environment. So if you can imagine a simple donut shape with a hole in the middle. Essentially what you get there is two circles, one smaller one inside, a bigger one. That smaller circle, we might often think of something that they term as the social foundation. And the social foundation is a set of 12 things that, when you consider them all in relation to one another, define the things that makes us human, and defines the things that just allow us to survive as humans, but allows us to really thrive as humans.

So it’s more than just thinking about food, water, shelter, clothing. It’s also thinking about those emotional needs that we have as well around peace and justice. Around meaningful connections with other people around access to education and opportunities. So I love to think about our social foundation as the center of the story of sustainability. Because humans are a part of this planet. And it is a very dangerous mindset, or a very dangerous kind of thing to get into, to think that the only way that we become more sustainable is by not being here. And that’s really not a good story to tell, and it’s not the right story to tell. We are part of the planet, and we can live within the boundaries of what the planet can provide for us.

And that moves me onto the second circle, this outer circle. And donor economics talks about that as our ecological boundaries or our ecological ceiling. And that’s basically accepting that the planet has a finite amount of resources. There’s only so much wind that blows. There’s only so many raw materials in the ground. There’s only so much accessible water, drinkable water. There’s only so much land.

It helps us understand that we have these boundaries in place. We have these limitations. So when we talk about sustainability, or when I’m talking personally talking about sustainability, I’m thinking about those concepts. I’m thinking about humanity being at the center of the planet. Being at the center of our concerns, but I’m also thinking that humanity has to live within these constraints that the world places upon us.

And in donor economics, if you have that donut shaped circle, if I’m hoping everyone listening can picture it or maybe you’ve looked it up online. If you’ve got this kind of circle, what you have is, the way the donor economics talks about it is we talk about sustainability as being this sweet spot in the middle where we are meeting everybody’s needs to thrive. But we are doing that within the boundaries of the planet. And that it is absolutely possible that we can have nice things and that we can be happy, healthy, joyful humans, but that we can live within the means of our planet.

So for me, sustainability is that broad concept. And I’m just going to stop there, Nathan, because I know we haven’t actually talked about this before and I’m curious to know, how that resonates with you, as a definition of sustainability or as a way of thinking about it.

[00:17:05] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah, I fully understand where you are coming from. I guess the piece that I’m confronted with is that, I always think of, how to describe this. I very often think of conservation and I think about it in terms of we’ve got to do less things. We’ve got to drive the car less. We’ve got to consume less electricity, we’ve got to get on planes less. We’ve got to produce less.

And so the environmental debate always, for me at least anyway, comes back to reducing what we’re doing and kind of admitting to ourselves that the aspirations that we seem to have as a species, to rampantly consume everything and believe that we are fully in charge of everything on the planet.

It feels as if we need to put the breaks on and actually, rather than that, we need to go in reverse. We need to, like I said, produce less things, consume less things. It sounds as if you’ve got a slightly different philosophy there, which is we’ve just got to figure out how we can carry on the way we are. But with cleverer solutions so that the things that we create, the plane journeys that we go on, the cars that we drive. All of that’s still possible, but we need to figure out how the impact of that would be lessened.

[00:18:28] Hannah Smith: Almost, yeah. That’s almost what I’m saying, but not quite. If we think about what we’re driving our cars for. What we are flying for. What are we doing these things for? It might be that the mechanism by which we create connection with one another or that we get from A to B, or that we see our family and friends, or that we have meaningful relationships with people.

It might be that those things are done differently. And yeah, so it might mean that we reduce car use. We reduce airplane flights. But that doesn’t mean we don’t replace it with other things. Technology is amazing. I mean, look at, look at the internet. It’s absolutely incredible what digital technology enables us to do.

So I think the story of sustainability, it’s very, very important to not get drawn into this narrative that we’ve all got to live like cave people, which is so often what people think being sustainable means. It means giving up all the things that bring us joy and bring us meaning in life.

And actually, I don’t buy that at all. I think that that is the wrong way to look at sustainability. I actually think what living in a truly sustainable way means is reducing the things that don’t give us those joyful things. Don’t provide meaningful connection in our life, and replacing them with the things that do. And do you know what? What’s amazing is that the things that genuinely, meaningfully do improve our lives, are generally sustainable, at the same time. Like riding a bike, walking, exercising, spending less time on social media, perhaps doing more time crafting or reading a book. Those things do all actually add to our lives, add to our happiness, add to our, you know, meaning and purpose.

So I think it’s a really important starting point just to say to the WordPress community, hey, look, being sustainable doesn’t mean we’re going to lose all these things that we love. In fact, we are going to lose the things that don’t service and replace them with better, better, more meaningful things.

[00:20:39] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah. One of the things that I find tricky is I don’t really equate my use of the internet with the environmental consequences that there are from my use of the internet. Before we hit record, I was talking to you, I described how the technology that I’m using, so I’ve got a computer in front of me, I have a mobile phone. Unless I actually apply thought, my default in a way, is that they are completely benign and harmless. Typically, if I’m using my mobile phone say, there’s not really any part of me which is consciously thinking, okay, for every minute that I spend on this phone, there’s a consequence to this. There’s an environmental impact. I’m consuming electricity. That phone needed to be charged, and the same would go for any device, any piece of technology, any website that I visit.

Just not bridging that gap. Whereas other things, so for example, the driving of the car. I’m acutely aware of the consequences of that because there’s things actually coming out of the rear of that car through the exhaust system that I can detect. I can feel the harm from that.

You know? There’s no way that if you told me to go and stand behind a car for 10 minutes and breathe in deeply. There’s no way that that’s going to be something that I wish to do. I can draw a, a line between the stuff that’s coming out the exhaust, and my health and lungs, I can completely understand that. Whereas the phone, like I said, is completely benign. I could do that for hours, and so, I do think it’s an interesting thing.

I wonder if you sense that generally speaking. When you have these discussions and you are trying to encourage people to equate internet use, technology use, whatever it may be, with the consequences of that, I’m wondering if people are generally, they’re open to it, they understand it, they draw that line themselves immediately.

Or is there a bit of, what, hang on a minute. I’ve, I’m going to have to apply some thought to this. What do you mean? How can my, how can my computer possibly be doing any harm?

[00:22:53] Hannah Smith: oh yeah, it’s such a good point. I mean, I can speak from my own experience as someone that has always been really interested in the environment, and really conscious of sustainability, environmentalism. And it wasn’t until I went to WordCamp Europe, when it was in Berlin actually, and Jack Lenox was giving a talk and Jack Lenox’s talk was, are website’s killing the planet? Something along those lines.

I had this like total mad aha moment where I was like, oh my God, right? Digital tech runs on electricity. Has to be built. All that stuff’s got to come from somewhere. So of course it has an impact. But it wasn’t until I heard Jack’s talk, and also around the same sort of time, I heard Whole Grain Digital talking as well, I put two and two together.

So it’s funny, but once, as soon as someone told me, oh yeah, you are using electricity to run this stuff. And of course electricity is mostly coming from the burning of fossil fuels, and all this stuff has to be manufactured. So all the lithium and cobalt, gold and silver and all the stuff that’s in your phone all has to come from somewhere. And that’s really energy intensive and damaging to create, or extract.

As soon as I was given that little push in the right direction, suddenly this whole cascade of implications unfolded in front of me, and I was like, oh, well, yeah obviously, now I see it. But I, like many people, I think just need to be given that little nudge. Really helps to hear someone say that explicitly. Hey, did you know that between, see if I can get the numbers right. 1.9 and 3.3% of the world’s global greenhouse gas emissions arise from our use of digital tech.

Did you know that that’s more than shipping and more than aviation? Did you know that that actually means that the internet becomes the world’s seventh biggest polluter is a country? When you start to hear those things, yeah, it dawns on you. And that’s certainly how I came into this space, or certainly how I kind of realized this for the first time.

Maybe many people listening to what I’ve just said, the light bulbs have just flicked on as well and gone, oh right, yeah, of course, good point. It’s unseen, isn’t it, this pollution? To your point earlier, it’s all been abstracted away from us, so that we have clean, convenient lives. As you rightly say, you know, our phones are really sleek. Our laptops are really sleek. And that’s part of the service I suppose, that we’re being provided. We’re being given this convenience. We’re being given beautiful, well designed things. But that impact, unfortunately, is still very real at the moment. Maybe in time to come, we’ll get to a place where it’s not.

We’ll have some new technologies that perhaps use the regenerative techniques, where we’re not extracting materials from the ground. Maybe we can start to grow them or find other ways to create them. But right now, yeah, that impact is real. Whoever came up with the term cloud really like clever, but from a sustainability angle, not helpful.

[00:26:15] Nathan Wrigley: It’s about the most benign thing imaginable, isn’t it? It’s fluffy and, welcoming and, you know, they’re associated with the sun and all of that. Yeah, that’s interesting.

[00:26:24] Hannah Smith: Yeah, and it’s just not true. Like actually it’s like a big diesel plume. To your point, actually the reality is 62% of the world’s energy, electricity comes from fossil fuel sources. And we can think about it as the internet is actually the world’s largest coal fired machine. When you start to have those pictures in your head, it does change your relationship to what you’re doing and what you have in front of you a bit I think.

[00:26:51] Nathan Wrigley: And I guess that’s really the purpose of what it is that you are doing in the article that you wrote. Is you are, you’re keenly aware of this. It’s obviously something which is meaningful to you on a personal level. And you are, you’re really scouting out for ideas and suggestions and, for the community to gather around, and come up with what we can do.

So, let’s lay out a few things in terms of WordPress. These are the things which just come into my mind as we’re sitting here talking to one another. I confess that there isn’t a great deal of backstory here. I’m just going to generate things as they come up into my mind.

So the first thing is that our website’s dependent upon what is being presented to the end user. So, you know, if it’s a, if it’s a website, which is rich in large images. If it’s a website which is rich in video. If it’s a website which has huge amounts of JavaScript and CSS. We are pushing more bits over the wire. And so maybe there’s a piece there. Can we cut down the amount that WordPress needs to do, and needs to deliver?Would that have an impact?

[00:28:00] Hannah Smith: Definitely.

[00:28:02] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah. And then another thing which comes into my head is, at the end of the day when I finish with my computer, the last thing I do is I switch it off. I turn it off, and then when I need it again, I’ll switch it on and I’ll, whenever I’ve finished I turn it off again, so it’s on, off, on, off.

What I’m trying to say is that it’s off more than It’s on. Significantly more. But our website hosting, let’s just call it that, wherever that might be, whatever system you are using. We need that to be on all the time because our websites need to be available all the time. That’s one of the points is something which is, you know, you don’t have to go to a website and be visited by a page which says, one moment, we’re just going to switch the computer on, and come back in a moment and everything will be ready to go.

No, you want it to be ready immediately. And in fact, we’re being told all the time that the faster our webpage is being served up, the better it’s going to do in search engine rankings, which is almost like a holy grail. So everything needs to be quicker and everything needs to be more available.

So there’s just a couple of pieces there really, which came to my head, the first one being that can we reduce the amount that WordPress has to serve up, and will that have a positive effect? And obviously that very much feels like a seesaw. You could argue that from both sides. But also the machines that our websites are running on, there’s probably quite a lot of conversations that we could have around there. The kind of things that hosting companies are doing to source the power and so on and so forth.

[00:29:30] Hannah Smith: Yeah, I mean, it’s brilliant, isn’t it? You start to think about these things and you’ve hit upon two real, really key actionable things that we can look at within WordPress. So we’re talking at the moment about electricity and energy use, and I’m just going to sort put this into context and say, hey, don’t forget that electricity and energy use is just one aspect of sustainability. There is a little bit more to it than that.

But I do think that when you are brand new to thinking about the impact of digital tech on sustainability, this is an absolutely awesome starting point. It’s very tangible and there’s quite a bit of research and tooling out there to help you. So I just want to kind of caveat and say, let’s deep dive into that for a little bit, awesome. But bear in mind, there’s more to think about.

There is a very direct relationship between the amount of data that you send and the amount of CO2 emissions that that creates. So the more data to use your words, the more data, the more stuff you’re sending down the wire, the more pollution or the more energy that you’re using.

And there’s a simple way to calculate this. For anyone that wants to get into this. If you know how much data you are sending, we can estimate how much electricity that is going to use to send that data from A to B. Whole load of assumptions that you’ll have to make in order to make that estimation.

But there’s some models out there that you can use. You can have a look at the sustainable web design website. So if you know how much data you’ve got, you can figure out an estimation of how much electricity that would use to send from A to B. And then we can use something called carbon intensity data.

And carbon intensity data allows us to understand how much CO2 emissions are created per unit of energy, or per unit of electricity that is created. So I mentioned to you that 62% of the worlds electricity is generated by fossil fuels. In different countries, and in different regions that will change. So I think Norway, for example, is 100% renewable energy.

So depending on where you are in the world, you’ll have different carbon intensities to consider. But yeah, so essentially it can come down, a really good starting point is to think about performance and optimization, and think about how can I reduce the waste around this. There are dozens of reasons why we should be thinking about performance anyway.

This is not a new ask of developers, or ask of technical people to think about performance. We have reasons around accessibility. We have reasons around cost. We also have reasons around SEO as well. The more performant and optimize something is, the better your SEO. And we also have things to think about in terms of people’s enjoyment of using said service, or said website.

And we can add another one, another cracking good reason to think about this optimization and performance, and that is also the sustainability angle. So, I mean, really this stuff is just stacking up and stacking up to be like a no brainer. If you want to be a sustainable web developer, your first job is to get good at performance and optimization.

[00:32:50] Nathan Wrigley: It’s interesting, the whole performance thing, while you were talking about that, I was thinking about the fact that performance really can go in two directions. The performance could be gained by cutting out waste, but it can also be gained by using more resources.

[00:33:05] Hannah Smith: Ha ha, yes, good shout.

[00:33:07] Nathan Wrigley: It is possible to simply say to yourself, I shall purchase more expensive hosting, which has got more CPUs and so on and so forth. And in that way, I cut out the need for me to make my website leaner, if you know what I mean. So, just to be clear, when you talk about performance, you really are talking about getting rid of the waste, considering whether that image needs to be that big or could it be smaller? Do I need to put that video on there? It’s more trimming things down as opposed to spending more money on a faster machine for example.

[00:33:39] Hannah Smith: Interesting point. I’m really glad we’re having this conversation. Yes and no I would answer that question. 100% the yes part is definitely around the waste. Is around just not sending stuff we don’t need. Not having analytics collecting that we don’t need. Not generating data that we don’t need.

The resources part is a really interesting one, because there’s a piece around maybe using our resources more wisely. So there can be arguments for perhaps having better hosting. Because if that better hosting, say you are serving a website across, you’ve got users all across the world visiting your website. Actually having a better hosting service that makes really good use of CDNs, content delivery networks, actually can have an impact on sustainability.

Because if you are serving your data closer to the person that actually wants to use that data, you can save quite a bit of energy, electricity, because you’re not sending it from one side of the world to the other. And there is an electricity cost to doing that. Again, it’s not seen by us, but it’s real. It is there.

So the service side, the hosting side of things. Something very specific you can do there is look for hosting companies that are using renewable energy, using renewable energy sources to power themselves. And I’m going to plug the Green Web Foundation where I’m working now.

We have a really awesome data set, which we’ve been collecting for 10 years or so on hosting companies that are powered by renewables. That’s a very specific action you can take. But yeah, to your point that you can make something really performant by chucking loads of resources at it. Yeah, that’s not what we are talking about here when we are talking about sustainability. We are talking about speeding things up through the use of wise resources instead.

[00:35:36] Nathan Wrigley: I know that time is pressing for you, so we’ll wrap up fairly shortly, but I just want to, just want to offer a few thoughts as well, and, the piece that I mentioned towards the beginning of the podcast where I said that, it’s very difficult I think for me, and I’m sure a lot of other people as well, to draw the line between the website and the impact on the environment, and I’m wondering if it might be that we need to be alerted to the consequences of our use of the internet.

So just throwing out some ideas, which probably, may very well have no legs, but just some thoughts really. Would be interesting, for example, if in the WordPress backend we could see something which gave us a measure of what it was that our website was doing. So if it gave us a direct link to okay, every, every time somebody comes to this particular page, this is what you are sending to them, and that has this kind of consequence.

Now, obviously, that’s much more complicated, as you’ve described, because it depends on the hosting that you’re using. It depends whether they’re close or far away. But just some sort of broad metrics so that we could understand what the consequence of the thing that we’re building is. So I don’t even know what that would look like. Maybe it would be some sort of graph or chart or just raw number that would give us some indication.

And then also more broadly, just browsing the internet. If we could have this kind of information coming back to us. So, I don’t know, I’m thinking of like a browser extension or something like that, which would measure what it was that I was doing when I went around the internet, and then give me some kind of feedback for, okay, this week you consumed this much in terms of electricity or carbon that was produced as a result of your browsing the internet.

Last week it was this, the week before it was this, so you know you’re going in the right direction. Just those kind of things. I’m just wondering if there are things afoot. Maybe tools that exist already, or projects that you know about that can help us to understand the consequences of what we are doing.

[00:37:39] Hannah Smith: Definitely, and do you know what Nathan? These ideas absolutely have legs and these are exactly the kind of ideas that we are inviting people to come and share on our post with us. All of these suggestions, all of these ideas are relevant and very, very actionable, and have already been actioned in certain ways.

So to your point about CO2, understanding CO2 emissions of websites, so there’s a fantastic tool called Website Carbon Calculator. I think the URL is websitecarbon.com. So you can go along to that and put any URL in, and immediately get a sense of how polluting that page is. And that is such an awesome tool to use with bosses or clients, who perhaps aren’t so interested in the nitty gritty technical detail, but want a number, or a statistic or a sense of how good or bad they’re doing.

And the Website Carbon Calculator has a little bit of JavaScript code that you can embed in your site that will give you a reading of each page of how much CO2 that that page is polluting. Now I believe that there is a plugin for that as well, and I don’t know if that would give you the information in the back end of WordPress, but Website Carbon Calculator’s being developed by Whole Grain Digital. If you’re interested in WordPress sustainability, I mean, they’re really thought leaders in this space, so definitely worth checking them out.

I had some conversations with Jenny Wong many years ago, and, and those of you that are in the UK WordPress community, you’ll probably know Jenny. I think most people do. And if you’re listening, Jenny, hello. Jenny and I exchanged some ideas around using Site Health, and actually building some of these ideas into Site Health. That section of the WordPress backend. It might be difficult to get that as a core contribution to begin with, but we could certainly look at making some plugins.

There’s loads and loads of data out there that we could use to surface these emissions. And then to your point about browsers, yes. Actually at the Green Web Foundation, we’ve been talking quite a lot with the Firefox people, made by Mozilla. And there are some open issues in GitHub at the moment around integrating carbon emission readings and estimations into the Firefox browser.

I don’t know off the top of my head whether the intention would be to track it in the way that you’ve talked, but you know how if you’re a developer, you, you might be familiar with the web dev tooling that we have, say within Firefox or Chrome. The idea is to create a separate tab in the performance section, to start to give you a reading within the browser as well.

So there are all these things happening, and this is where I really want to invite people to come and join us. Please let us share these initiatives that are happening. If you’ve got some time and capacity and you’ve got some energy, and you want to take action, we desperately want people to come and join in, and make these things happen. So yeah, please share these ideas that you have.

[00:40:49] Nathan Wrigley: Thank you. Yeah, that’s really, really interesting. Just before we wrap it up finally, it just occurs to me that we’re always looking for ways to, to have a competitive edge. If you are a freelancer or an agency, you’re always trying to figure out ways that you are different from your competition. And it just strikes me that maybe this, maybe this could be one of those ways. You are one of the developers who actually gives this some thought. And it may very well be that there are a whole load of clients out there for whom this would be a very important metric when making hiring decisions, so.

[00:41:24] Hannah Smith: Such a good point. As a freelance WordPress developer, uh, you know, people were, were starting to know me as someone who knew about digital sustainability and who could build sustainable WordPress sites, you know, efficient WordPress sites. And the demand was mad. I couldn’t keep up with it. I was constantly being like, oh, I need more people to recommend this work to. So yeah, I think this is a really strong selling point, and it makes you feel good as well, to know that you’re doing the best you can, you’re doing the right things.

[00:41:55] Nathan Wrigley: Hannah, just as a very final thing. If people have been interested in this, I will obviously link to the post in the show notes. You can check those out on wptavern.com, but if they want to contact you, are you available? And if so, where should we do that? What’s the best way to reach out to you?

[00:42:12] Hannah Smith: Yeah, well, I mean, I would love to chat with anyone that’s interested in bouncing some ideas around, or is interested in finding out more. The best way to get hold of me is through the Green Web Foundation, so hannah@thegreenwebfoundation.org, or if you’re in make WordPress you can also drop me a line. You’ll see me lurking around in the sustainability channel quite a lot in the make WordPress Slack space. You can drop me a line there too.

[00:42:38] Nathan Wrigley: Hannah Smith, thank you very much for joining us on the podcast.

[00:42:41] Hannah Smith: Oh, thank you Nathan. Thank you for making time for this today. I really appreciate it.

On the podcast today, we have Hannah Smith.

Hannah is the Operations and Training Manager for the Green Web Foundation and founder of the Let’s Green The Web campaign. She’s also co-founder of Green Tech South West.

Her background is in Computer Science. She previously worked as a freelance WordPress developer, and also for the Environment Agency, where she managed large business change projects.

It’s pretty easy to forget that the device that you’re reading this post on is consuming power. We plug things in or charge them up, and they just work. They are sleek and sterile. No pollution comes out of the device directly. In fact, I’d go as far as to say that many of us never make the connection between our use of technology and the impact this has on the environment.

Enter Hannah Smith. She’s been thinking about this for years and is on the podcast today to highlight the issue, and hopefully get your ideas about what users of WordPress can do to make sure that the websites we create are having the smallest impact possible.

Her approach is not that we need to cease and desist using our technology. Rather, it’s about coming up with new and innovative ways that we can reduce the impact that we have.

As creators of websites, there are a whole raft of options available to us. Reducing the size of our images. Inspecting the HTML to remove bloat. Choosing hosting options that source renewable energy.

With this in mind, Hannah and others have been working on a sustainability related blog post which has been published on the Make WordPress site this week.

This post is intended to trigger meaningful and open discussion in the global WordPress community about the topic of sustainability. She really wants to encourage others to weigh into this public conversation with their own thoughts, so we can build on what is already happening to make WordPress more sustainable.

It’s a fascinating and thought-provoking topic.

Useful links.

The Green Web Foundation website

#Let’sGreenTheWeb Campaign

Wholegrain Digital website

Sustainable Web Design website

Website Carbon Calculator

by Nathan Wrigley at November 23, 2022 03:00 PM under sustainability

WPTavern: BuddyPress 11.0.0 to Limit JavaScript and CSS Asset Loading to Community Pages Using a Filter

BuddyPress will soon be improving the way it loads its JavaScript and CSS assets so that they are only loaded on community pages. Previously, the plugin would load them indiscriminately on every page.

BuddyPress lead developer Mathieu Viet said he’s not sure there is a specific reason explaining why this was kept in place. Before the plugin introduced the BP Theme Compat API in version 1.7, it was necessary to use a BuddyPress compatible theme like the one bundled by default (BP Default).

“I think we kept the way this theme was loading these assets into the first Template Pack (BP Legacy) we added to BuddyPress,” Viet said.

Users have often requested BuddyPress only load its assets on community pages in hopes of further optimizing their websites. For example, in 2020, a user on the BuddyDev forums requested custom code to accomplish this. Experts recommended against doing it

“It is not going to help you much and will cause a lot of issues in future,” BuddyPress contributor Brajesh Singh said. “There are dependent plugins which may start throwing JavaScript errors and breaking some of your site functionality. It is not worth the effort.”

Singh recommended the user enable browser caching to avoid loading the assets multiple times and stick to best practices for enabling gzip compression and other optimization measure. He also recommended adding a plugin that would conditionally prevent loading BuddyPress on certain pages.

Coming in version 11.0.0, BuddyPress core will progressively move towards loading only the assets it needs in community areas. This update will still load JS and CSS everywhere but will offer a filter that users can add to their bp-custom.php files in order to keep BP assets on community pages only:

add_filter( ‘bp_enqueue_assets_in_bp_pages_only’, ‘__return_true’ );

“If using the above filter, you notice something is going wrong with your website due to the use of a specific BP plugin or theme, report it here and we’ll then have another development cycle to fix things before we completely restrict these assets to BuddyPress generated pages in a second step in version 12.0.0,” Viet said.

Version 11.0.0 is expected to be released on December 14, 2022. Early adopters and BuddyPress site owners who have always wished for the plugin to behave this way can take advantage of it after the next major update using the filter. The filter can also be easily removed if users are troubleshooting and having issues with plugins.

by Sarah Gooding at November 23, 2022 12:28 AM under News

November 22, 2022

WPTavern: New Tool Checks If Google Fonts Are Hosted Locally

Earlier this year, WordPress’ Themes Team began urging theme authors to switch to locally hosted fonts after a German court case decision, which fined a website owner for violating the GDPR by using Google-hosted webfonts. Since that ruling, German website owners have continued to receive threats of fines for not having their fonts hosted locally.

The makers of the Fonts Plugin, a commercial product with a free version on WordPress.org, have created a tool called Google Fonts Checker that will help website owners discover where their fonts are hosted. The tool analyzes any URL entered and if the fonts are hosted by Google, it says “Google Fonts Connection Found” with a red ‘X.’ Sites that are in the clear will show a notice that a Google Fonts connection was not found:

Google Fonts Checker is useful for non-technical users who are not sure whether their theme or plugins are referencing fonts hosted on Google’s servers. Beyond delivering the simple connection message, the tool scans the website and returns a list of the font files used to render the page, which can be helpful in tracking down the specific extension loading these files.

More than 200,000 people are using the Fonts Plugin to load assets from the Google Fonts Library. Although the Google Fonts Checker tool is free to use and doesn’t require any personal information or login, the free version of the Fonts Plugin doesn’t support hosting fonts locally. Users will either need to upgrade to the commercial version or use a different plugin, like Local Google Fonts or the OMGF | Host Google Fonts Locally plugin, both of which perform this for free.

Those who find a Google Fonts connection using the tool may also consider switching to Bunny Fonts, an open-source, privacy-first web font platform with no tracking or logging that is fully GDPR compliant. It can act as a drop-in replacement to Google Fonts. The Replace Google Fonts with Bunny Fonts plugin makes it easy to switch.

Some of WordPress’ older default themes are still loading fonts from Google. A ticket for bundling the fonts with the legacy default themes had patches and was on track to be included in WordPress 6.1, but ended up getting punted to a future release after it was determined the approach needed more work. In the meantime, those who are concerned about using Google Fonts in older default themes can use a plugin to host them locally.

by Sarah Gooding at November 22, 2022 09:49 PM under google fonts

WordPress.org blog: The Month in WordPress – October 2022

With the end of the year fast approaching, the WordPress project has not slowed down. Read on to learn more about the latest major release, WordPress 6.1, and the State of the Word 2022 live event, among other exciting news. It’s time to catch up on all things WordPress!


Say hello to WordPress 6.1 “Misha”

The third and last major release of 2022, WordPress 6.1 “Misha,” shipped on November 1, 2022. Named after jazz pianist Mikhail “Misha” Alperin, this release comes packed with many improvements that refine the site-building experience introduced earlier this year in WordPress 5.9 and 6.0, as well as accessibility and performance upgrades.

WordPress 6.1 is also bundled with a new default block theme, Twenty Twenty-Three (TT3), that features 10 style variations designed by WordPress community members. These intentionally unique designs ensure that you can change the visual details of your site with ease—and within a single theme.

Learn more about what’s in 6.1:

Following WordPress 6.1 “Misha”, a 6.1.1 maintenance release landed on November 15, 2022. This minor release includes about 50 bug fixes.

Download WordPress 6.1.1

State of the Word 2022 is coming on December 15

Decorative blue background with text:

State of the Word 2022, the annual keynote address delivered by the WordPress project’s co-founder, Matt Mullenweg, will be held on December 15, 2022. The event will take place in person in New York City and live-streamed via various WordPress.org social media platforms.

You can also host or join a State of the Word watch party to enjoy the event with your WordPress friends.

Learn more about State of the Word 2022

What’s new in Gutenberg

Two new versions of Gutenberg have shipped in the last month:

  • Gutenberg 14.4 was released on October 26, 2022, with support for a distraction-free mode that allows a more focused writing experience. Other notable highlights include a redesigned pattern inserter, content locking to the Navigation block, and improvements to fluid typography.
  • Gutenberg 14.5 sets the groundwork for future releases with code quality improvements and bug fixes. This version introduces a new “Document Overview” panel for easier access to the list view and document information, expands margin and padding support, and improves spacing visualizers. It was released on November 9, 2022.

Explore some of the latest enhancements to the writing experience in this Core Editor Improvement post.

Team updates: Documentation Contributor Day, WordPress.org redesign updates, and more

Enjoy a spooky Halloween Mad Libs story completed by community contributors in Episode 42 of WP Briefing.

Feedback & testing requests

Were you involved in WordPress 6.1? Share your thoughts on the release process by December 15, 2022.

Event updates & WordCamps

Boost your speaking confidence in WordPress events. Register for the How to Own Your Expertise & Start Speaking at WordPress Events online workshop happening December 7, 2022.


Have a story that we should include in the next issue of The Month in WordPress? Fill out this quick form to let us know.

The following folks contributed to this edition of The Month in WordPress: @rmartinezduque, @webcommsat, @santanainniss, @dansoschin, @eidolonnight.

by rmartinezduque at November 22, 2022 11:00 AM under month in wordpress

Do The Woo Community: Building a Cloud-Based SaaS versus Hosted 

Learn why NitroPack made the decision to go cloud-based vs. self hosted with the SasS product.

>> The post Building a Cloud-Based SaaS versus Hosted  appeared first on Do the Woo - a WooCommerce Builder Community .

by BobWP at November 22, 2022 10:18 AM under Product Builders

WPTavern: WordPress Launches Developer Blog In Beta

WordPress.org will soon be launching a blog for developers. The blog went into beta at the end of last week and resides on a subdomain of the main site. It is sporting a design similar to WordPress’ general News blog.

One of the big picture goals that WordPress’ Executive Director Josepha Haden-Chomphosy identified for 2022 was the creation of a developer-focused communications site. This new blog is the culmination of an effort that began earlier this year.

“Staying on top of the new features coming to the WordPress open-source project is one of the main barriers expressed by developers,” contributor Birgit Pauli-Haack said in the original proposal.

“The Make Core blog has a heavy emphasis on meeting notes for the various core teams, rather than highlighting new features. This makes it difficult for developers who are not contributors or who just occasionally contribute to find the relevant information among the team-related posts.”

Content on the new developer blog will be focused on updates applicable to theme and plugin creators, developers who work at agencies, Gutenberg API updates, advanced programming concepts, PHP gems, and developer case studies.

 There are already three posts published, which offer a hint at what kind of content WordPress developers can expect on the blog:

The blog’s editorial process is being entirely managed on GitHub from pitches to publication. Anyone who wants to contribute can post to the Ideas board for discussion. Approved ideas become blessed tasks and drafts and go through two reviews. People can contribute by posting ideas, writing posts, or joining the editorial team that reviews posts.

Now that the blog is in beta, contributors are looking for feedback from WordPress’ developer community. Leave comments on the beta announcement or join the next meeting in the core-dev-blog WP Slack channel on December 1, at 13:00 UTC. Subscribe to the RSS feed to never miss a post from WordPress’ new developer blog.

by Sarah Gooding at November 22, 2022 03:10 AM under News

November 21, 2022

WPTavern: State of the Word 2022 Will Be Livestreamed from New York City on December 15

Matt Mullenweg’s annual State of the Word (SOTW) address will be delivered in New York City this year before a live audience, on December 15. The event format is similar to last year where a small group of invited guests will join in person.

Traditionally, the State of the Word has been given at WordCamp US, capping off the event with an inspiring review of WordPress’ progress and a lively Q&A session. Starting in 2020, due to the pandemic, the SOTW transitioned to a separate, smaller event that can be broadcast to all who cannot attend. Organizers are planning to livestream this year’s event across WordPress.org’s social media platforms. 

Unlike last year, where prominent members of the community were invited to attend, organizers have created a form where anyone can request an invitation to attend. Seats are available to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. The form states that masks will not be required at the event, a policy that is as controversial today as it was last year, and makes it impossible for medically vulnerable people to attend:

“While at the event, masks are not mandatory but encouraged, as is using hand sanitizer and social distancing.”

Since the majority of people will be watching via live stream, the Q&A portion of the event will be handled via email for virtual participants. Anyone can ask a question in advance by emailing ask-matt@wordcamp.org or may ask during the event in the live stream chat on YouTube. WordPress Executive Director Josepha Haden-Chomphosy said there may be a follow-up post published with answers to questions not covered at the event.

The live stream will be embedded in the announcement post and will also air on WordPress’ YouTube channel on December 15, 2022, at 1–2:30 P.M. EST (18–19:30 UTC). Those who are hosting watch parties are encouraged to email support@wordcamp.org for additional resources from the Community Team.

by Sarah Gooding at November 21, 2022 11:40 PM under state of the word

WordPress.org blog: State of the Word 2022

Decorative blue background with text:

Hello, WordPress! 

Mark your calendars; it’s almost time for State of the Word 2022!

State of the Word is the annual keynote address delivered by the WordPress project’s co-founder, Matt Mullenweg. Every year, the event shares reflections on the project’s progress and the future of open source. Expect this and more in this year’s edition.

This year’s event will take place in person in New York City and live-streamed via various WordPress.org social media platforms. 

Join Matt as he provides a retrospective of 2022, the latest WordPress releases, Site Editor advancements, and a return to in-person events around the globe, among other topics.

What: State of the Word 2022

When: December 15, 2022, 1–2:30 P.M. EST (18–19:30 UTC)

How: If you’re watching from the comfort of your home or local watch party, the live stream will be embedded in this post and available through the WordPress YouTube channel.

Would you like to join the in-person audience? Request a seat by completing this survey.

Have a question for Matt?

State of the Word will include a Q&A session. If you want to participate, you can either send your question ahead of time to ask-matt@wordcamp.org or ask during the event in the live stream chat on YouTube.

Given the volume of questions that are usually submitted, please note that it may not be possible to answer all of them in the live Q&A. A follow-up post will be published after the State of the Word to answer those not covered at the event.

First time attending State of the Word? Check out previous years’ recordings on WordPress.tv to get a sense of the event.

See you in person or online on December 15!


Join a State of the Word Watch Party near You

Can’t make it to New York? No problem, organize or join a watch party in your community in person or online. Like last year, the Community team has resources available to help! Check out this handbook page, which includes event templates, information on requesting a Zoom account, and how to get some swag.

Gather together to look back on how WordPress has grown in 2022 and what is ahead for 2023. Stay up-to-date as a group on the latest happenings in the WordPress world and collaborate together on any questions you might have for Matt!

We will be compiling a list of State of the Word watch parties in this post, which will be updated regularly as the event approaches. If you don’t see a watch party in your region listed here in the next few weeks, check this page on Meetup.com to see if your local WordPress group is organizing one.

If you are planning a watch party for State of the Word and have questions, please email support@wordcamp.org. A member of the WordPress community team will assist you in the best way possible.

by Josepha at November 21, 2022 05:14 PM under state of the word

November 19, 2022

Gutenberg Times: Block Art, MindMap block, Slotfills, Patterns and more – Weekend Edition #236

Howdy,

I am so excited about next week! Finally, there will be another Six-a-side Festival at the Sarasota International Cricket Club. I’ll be there Saturday and Sunday. I am excited to see all the friends again, most I haven’t seen in three years.

If you are in the area, come on by. It’s a lot of fun, a diverse community, and you can meet cricketers from England, the Caribbean, and the West-Indies coming together to play cricket, party and play cricket again the next day and the next. It’s great fun for the whole family!

What are your plans for next week? I hope you have a fabulous one!

In this edition, you’ll find a vast array of videos, blog posts and podcasts from Learn.WordPress, WordPress TV and around the community. Let’s get started!

Yours, 💕
Birgit


Developing Gutenberg and WordPress

If you found the Field guide of WordPress 6.1 too developer centric, yet the announcement post not detailed enough, then let Courtney Robertson, team rep of the WordPress Training team, show you What’s new in WordPress 6.1: Misha


Hostinger’s Leonardus Nugraha, member of the WordPress docs team, published WordPress 6.1: What’s New in the New Major Release in collaboration with yours truly.


Also, part of WordPress 6.1 is a new default theme. In her post Introducing Twenty Twenty-Three, Beatriz Fialho, design lead, takes you a long for the journey exploring the new default theme and it’s community-submitted style variations.

You’ll find more details about the features of Twenty Twenty-three in the End User documentation article


WordPress 6.1.1 was released, fixing a few bugs on the backend and frontend of the software. Core contributors and release leads JB Audras, Jeff Paul and George Mamadashvili, worked hard to get this out with two weeks of the 6.1 release. This was a really fast turn around.


In his Design Share: Oct 24-Nov 4, Joen Asmussen lists the project the WordPress design team has been working on. The visuals representation of upcoming feature are absolutely exciting. First up are the screens of possible location for the Custom CSS feature, many of you found missing around the block themes. You can also see the design explorations for the interface to make a Group block sticky. You could use it for an ever present navigation bar or a public service announcement. Or an ongoing news ticker banner.

If you use the latest version of the Gutenberg plugin, you might have noticed, that the the info screen with the meta information on word count, or the outline was moved into the List view as an additional tab. The design team also explored more delightful designs for this panel.


James Koster tries to answer how to make it possible to push local block styles to global block styles. In other words, after you modified the look and feel of a single block, how can you make the styles persistent for all the blocks of that particular type on your site.

🎙️ New episode: Gutenberg Changelog #76 – The new developer blog’s public beta, Gutenberg 14.5 and 14.6, and what’s coming up in 6.2. with special guest, Ryan Welcher, and host Birgit Pauli-Haack.

The WordPress meta, design, and marketing teams have been working on the redesign of the Showcase page on the main website. Joen Asmussen reports on the progress in his post A refresh of WordPress.org/Showcase. “The current work represents a starting point that will continue to be iterated upon as additional features, and content changes are explored.” he wrote. He also provides links to the Figma file and the Showcase GitHub repository.

Gutenberg 14.5 released

Nick Diego was the lead for last week’s Gutenberg plugin release. In his posts What’s new in Gutenberg 14.5? (9 November) he wrote: “It consolidates the list view and document information, expands margin and padding support while improving spacing visualizers, and sets the groundwork for future releases with numerous code quality improvements and bug fixes.”


Sarah Gooding also reported on the latest release in Gutenberg 14.5 Introduces New “Document Overview” Panel, Improves Block Spacing Controls.

One of the new features is a new Social Link Block for Mastodon accounts, Mastodon, is an open-source decentralized social network, that many feel comfortable as using while Twitter seems to be deteriorating fast.


George Hotelling, WordPress core contributor, wrote a short tutorial on How to verify your WordPress site on Mastodon.

On a side note, I just created the @gutenbergtimes account on the mastodon server at twit.social. If you want to follow, just search for https://twit.social/@gutenbergtimes on any mastodon server, and you can follow me there. It’s a new account so not much going on.

My personal account is https://mastodon.social/@bph.


Gutenberg 14.6 RC is already available for testing. The stable version will be release by Fabian Kägy on November 23, 2022

Plugins, Themes, and Tools for #nocode site builders and owners

Thien Nguyen published his Mindmap Block It’s a cool block that provides the conversion from Markdown input in the block editor to a Mind map display on the frontend. This could get fascinating when Phase 3 of the Gutenberg project progresses, as then you can use this to collaborate on mind maps, too. We’ll revisit this in two years or so. It’s not a free plugin, and it is available on Gumroad with single site or unlimited site levels.

Today’s count is 182 Themes supporting the Site editor in the WordPress Themes Directory. New themes are available by the Block Styles team, Brian Gardner, Blockify, Catch Themes, Wen Solutions, and by Wwwows.

Another recently added theme is Loudness: A New Block Theme from Automattic It’s an artistic and opinionated theme . Sarah Gooding has the skinny for you.


Rich Tabor and Courtney Portnoy discussed The creative side of blocks on WordPressTV. Rich Tabor walks the viewers through one of his block art creations. It’s quite inspiring to watch Tabor’s exploratory creative process using the block editor. I learned quite a few things about the power of the various color features: gradient, nested group blocks, and how to replace the theme’s primary and secondary colors for the whole site. You’ll also get an introduction to the Museum of Block Art, where Rich and other block artists showcase their creations.


On the Torque Social Hour, host Doc Pop interviewed Roy Sivan and James Tryon about Block Styles Community and plugins built by the two. Gutenberg adopters of the first hour, the team aims to augment the Block editor with Block Styles to make it a professional page builder for power users. They created 160 input fields to customize a site.

The most obvious styles enhancements are the tools to separate the page layout features by screen sizes for desktop, tablet, and mobile. It’s a bit unfortunate to give a product / membership service the same name as a WordPress feature. Plugin developers have the advantage of a shortened implementation time and run into the danger to be passed by core in the long run.

Missing Menu plugin and the newest block theme Gesso were also mentioned on the show.

Theme Development for Full Site Editing and Blocks

Daisy Olsen wrote about Demystifying Home and Posts Templates in WordPress theme development, explains the WordPress Themes Hierarchy for both classic and block themes.


In his post Creating Themes from a Pattern-First Mindset, Justin Tadlock helped theme developers interested in block themes to see the power of using pattern in their templates to reduce code redundancy and simplicity.


On Tuesday next week (Nov 22) Daisy Olsen and Justin Tadlock, together with Damon Cook will hold a Hallway Hangout on Future of CSS in block themes. It will be in a casual chat about some Block Theme development-related features that are under active development. Hope to see you there 🙂


Ganesh Dahal wrote about Managing CSS Styles in a WordPress Block Theme and took a deep dive into the migration from styles.css files to theme.json. “One of the major benefits of moving CSS to JSON is that JSON is a machine-readable format, which means it can be exposed in the WordPress Site Editor UI by fetching an API, thus allowing users to modify default values and customize a site’s appearance without writing any CSS at all.” he wrote.

 “Keeping up with Gutenberg – Index 2022” 
A chronological list of the WordPress Make Blog posts from various teams involved in Gutenberg development: Design, Theme Review Team, Core Editor, Core JS, Core CSS, Test and Meta team from Jan. 2021 on. Updated by yours truly. The index 2020 is here

Sarah Gooding reports on an update of the Create Theme plugin in her post: Gutenberg’s Roadmap for a “Font Library” Will Give Users an Interface for Registering and Managing Web Fonts. Besides the features: create a new theme, start with a blank theme, create a child theme, or create a style variation, in now sports a dedicated screen for managing fonts. In her post, Gooding also summarized the tracking ticket on the Webfonts API and links to design exploration for a font manager within the core app.


Mike McAlister shows you Three beautiful font pairs to bring your design to life. “With all the new fonts out there, there’s no excuse to be using tired old fonts on your website. Here are a few fonts that should definitely be on your radar.” he wrote.


Building Blocks and Tools for the Block editor.

Fränk Klein was a guest on the WP Jukebox podcast episode #50 and discussed with host Nathan Wrigley about How Gutenberg and Full Site Editing Are Bringing New Opportunities for WordPress Developers.


Manoj Kumal wrote a tutorial on CSS-Tricks on Creating a Settings UI for a Custom WordPress Block. It’s the third post in the series “Working With External APIs in WordPress Blocks”. The first two post cover the rendering of external data on backend and frontend. The last post on “Saving custom block settings” is coming soon.


Ryan Welcher is back streaming on Twitch again! This week’s topic was Working with Query Loop block variations, a new feature that came with the latest major WordPress 6.1. You can read the dev note on then WordPress make blog: Extending the Query Loop block.

As always, if you read this post two weeks after it was published, you’ll find the recording of the Twitch streams on Ryan Welcher’s YouTube channel.


Jonathan Bossenger and Álvaro Gómez ran a two-part workshop on Developing blocks without React. The recordings are now available on WordPress TV:


Dan Knauss of Post Status reported on The Future of GiveWP and the Block Editor. He summarized: “The journey to GiveWP 3.0 is well underway — an open, iterative development process that fully embraces WordPress’s Gutenberg block editor. Give cofounder Matt Cromwell and development director Jason Adams share what they’ve learned so far.”

The main reasons for the rebuild are that the plugin match visual experience of the block editor, the need for more form field flexibility and to simplify template building. “Taking advantage of the components and packages of the block editor, as visual builder framework, continually improved and maintained by the open-source project, the GiveWP developers were faster in getting specific features done in a matter of hours rather than months.

Need a plugin .zip from Gutenberg’s master branch?
Gutenberg Times provides daily build for testing and review.
Have you been using it? Hit reply and let me know.

GitHub all releases

Upcoming WordPress events

New Date! December 16, 2022
WordFest Live Returns – the 24-hour Festival of WordPress

February 17 – 19, 2023
WordCamp Asia 2023 – the first round of speakers was announced

Have a look at the schedule of upcoming WordCamps to find one near you.

Learn WordPress Online Meetups

November 21, 2022 – 3 pm ET / 20:00 UTC
Intro to the Site Editor & Template Editor with Wes Theron

November 22, 2022 – 3:30 pm ET / 20:30 UTC
Hallway Hangout: Future of CSS in block themes

November 22, 2022 – 11 am ET / 16:00 UTC Repeated at 5 pm ET / 22:00 UTC
Designing in the Site Editor: A WordPress Block Theme Exploration

November 22, 2022 – 7 pm ET / 24:00 UTC – Repeated at 11 pm ET / 4:00 UTC
Demystifying Gutenberg

December 1, 2022 – 3 pm ET / 20:00 UTC
Builder Basics: Building with Columns, Groups, Rows and Stacks with Nick Diego

December 8, 2022 – 3 pm ET / 20:00 UTC
Builder Basics: Demystifying theme.json and Global Styles with Nick Diego


Featured Image: Early morning. Building with where the lights are on by Paal Joachim Romdaal found on WordPress.org/photos


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by Birgit Pauli-Haack at November 19, 2022 11:21 PM under Weekend Edition

WPTavern: Divi 5.0 Aims to Bring Greater Compatibility with Gutenberg

Divi, the popular commercial WordPress theme and page builder created by Elegant Themes, has announced major changes coming in version 5.0 that constitute a complete rewrite of Divi’s core technologies. The update, which is expected to be released in beta next year, will focus on performance, stability, scalability, and extendability, but it will not introduce any new features.

“We are recreating Divi’s backend framework, cleaning up years of technical debt, changing Divi’s storage format and improving its rendering mechanism,” Elegant Themes CEO Nick Roach said. “This new version of Divi will be able to processes design settings much more quickly.”

One of the most notable changes coming in 5.0 is that Divi will be migrating away from shortcodes.

“This change will bring Divi into alignment with the future of WordPress, which is evolving in a new direction,” Roach said.

Divi will migrate to a new JSON format that is similar to the way Gutenberg stores data. The legacy shortcodes will continue to work and for a time Divi will lazy load in the old framework as necessary.

“If you are using Divi shortcodes outside of your post content, it will be highly recommended to replace these shortcodes with our new json-based elements,” Roach said. “Otherwise, you are going to take a performance hit.”

As part of the 5.0 update, Divi’s developers plan to include a button to perform the migration away from shortcodes, which will automatically change posts to use the new system.

Divi 5.0 will also introduce a new Builder API, which Roach said “may also open up opportunities for Divi/Gutenberg cross-compatibility:”

Developers familiar with creating blocks for WordPress will find a lot of similarities in the Divi 5.0 module API. WordPress blocks will be more easily adapted to Divi and WordPress developers will be able to jump head first into building things for our community. We are building this new version of Divi to work in harmony with WordPress.

News of the coming update was well-received by Divi users who posted additional questions and concerns in the comments. A few users were skeptical about the new direction but willing to see how it pans out.

Peter R, a current user who said he appreciates Divi’s “nicer and smoother UX,” along with the collections of design settings, indicated that Divi seems to be falling behind what the block editor offers for building pages with dynamic data:

As nice as Divi 5.0 sounds, it’s just sooo far away… especially since it won’t have the features I’m looking for at launch which will then take even longer if those features appear at all. I was really hoping Divi 5.0 would move more towards the Gutenberg block builder (other than back-end data storage etc).

There seems to be a real arms race going on with block builders right now. Many are adding features that Divi simply can’t compete with now and will probably take years to match if at all. Far more flexible layouts especially when it comes to making your own post loops etc, more powerful features for displaying dynamic data or for collecting and storing data, and the ability to mix-and-match blocks from different creators so you don’t depend on a single provider like Divi.

More than 2,425,411 live websites are currently using Divi and an an additional 1,486,812 sites that used the product historically, according to BuiltWith. The nearly 10-year-old product has grown steadily for years but seems to have plateaued beginning in 2020.

Embracing the way WordPress is going will be important for the page builder’s continued success, and Elegant Themes seems to be acknowledging this with the planned update.

“On the block theme front, as a part of Divi 5.0, we are also transitioning into a Block Based theme, and since Divi 5.0 is actually internally built using the same ‘packages’ that Gutenberg itself is composed of, Divi 5.0 has a lot of compatibility built in from the core,” Elegant Themes developer Josh Ronk said.

“We are working diligently to push Divi 5.0 for maximum Gutenberg block compatibility, with the goal being that you would be able to use Gutenberg blocks inside of your Divi built pages, and then apply all of the Divi design options you love to the otherwise plain Gutenberg blocks you have installed. This means you won’t have to choose between Divi or Gutenberg, and rather you get Divi AND Gutenberg.”

Divi’s developers plan to ensure the old Divi modules built with the current Divi API are backwards-compatible, working on the front end but with a more limited capacity in the Visual Builder. They will be encouraging developers to move to the new API to take advantage of the performance benefits.

Divi 5.0 will not introduce new features or changes to Divi’s design, but the underlying architecture will be moving closer to Gutenberg compatibility.

“Divi 5.0 will use React and it will leverage more of the native Gutenberg packages,” Roach said. “At some point we hope that Divi and Gutenberg will work in harmony. We don’t want to fight against the direction that WordPress is heading.”

by Sarah Gooding at November 19, 2022 12:07 AM under elegant themes

November 18, 2022

Post Status: WordPress Community Roundup

A New Home for the WordPress Community?

It sounds like a tall order, but there it is: over at Ollie, Mike McAlister has proposed “a thought experiment and design concept” called OpenPress:

What would it look like to start connecting millions of websites, users, and content that power half of the web in a more purposeful and open way?

Alex Kirk drew attention to his work on a plugin I'd never heard of called Friends. Friends makes it easier to follow your selected blogs/RSS feeds inside WordPress — and restrict some posts to a private network of friends. There are content blocks with restricted visibility “for friends on a per-block basis.” Friends “supports IndieAuth” and “doesn’t interfere with other IndieWeb projects such as Webmentions.”

Black Friday/Cyber Monday is coming quickly! Submit your deals here
Find this year’s deals here. (More are being added weekly!)

Sabina Ionescu published a lot of different responses from people in the WordPress community to questions about the impact of the pandemic on them.

The history of screen readers is incredible! Sheon Han tells their hidden story and how “blind programmers have been creating the tools their community needs” — for decades.

Joanne Limburg discusses the agonizing and awful, inadequate questions about disability in job applications, government forms, and thoughtless conversations.

Dan Knauss blogged about “crip time.” What happens if we think about time management through disability, pain, grief, or the needs of children?

Upcoming Events

WordCamps are back. Check the schedule online!

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Dan Knauss at November 18, 2022 08:30 PM under WordFest

Post Status: WordPress Business Roundup for the Week of November 14

Tom Willmot on the Challenges and Opportunities  Facing Enterprise WordPress • Tom Lach on the costs of rapid growth — It's not for everyone • The Future of GiveWP and the Block Editor • Evolving Edupack — and Sunsetting It • and more…

Estimated reading time: 8 minutes

Tom Willmot on the Challenges and Opportunities  Facing Enterprise WordPress

Sparked by Magne Ilsaas‘s ideas in The WordPress Enterprise Paradox, Tom started a Twitter thread and hosted a live discussion with Magne and others at enterprise WordPress agencies this week. Their main concern is the challenges that arise from not having a well-defined brand and market that allows “WordPress for the Enterprise” to stand out — without being ties to a particular WordPress company or host. After getting an outline of the problem as it stands today, I asked Tom what might help differentiate “Enterprise WordPress” as a collective or entire ecosystem of agencies operating within it. Can open-source values of sharing and cooperation shape a unique global identity for enterprise WordPress agencies? Is it time for an inter-agency association or “guild” to take on these challenges? LISTEN→

Big Growth Isn’t for Everyone

Back in 2019, Tom Lach‘s agency was a team of 10 people, and they were entering a space where they could easily start working with big enterprises. Their idea of the future was to scale up and grow. Of course it was. How honest conversations at WCEU changed that. READ→

The Future of GiveWP and the Block Editor

The journey to GiveWP 3.0 is well underway — an open, iterative development process that fully embraces WordPress's Gutenberg block editor. Give cofounder Matt Cromwell and development director Jason Adams share what they've learned so far. READ→

Evolving Edupack — and Sunsetting It

Blake Bertuccelli shares how a plugin that tried to do it all led to an accessibility platform and enhanced client services. READ→

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Dan Knauss at November 18, 2022 05:36 PM under WPwatercooler

Post Status: Tom Willmot on the Challenges and Opportunities Facing Enterprise WordPress — Post Status Draft 130

Sparked by Magne Ilsaas‘s ideas in The WordPress Enterprise Paradox, Tom started a Twitter thread and hosted a live discussion with Magne and others at enterprise WordPress agencies this week. Their main concern is the challenges that arise from not having a well-defined brand and market that allows “WordPress for the Enterprise” to stand out — without being ties to a particular WordPress company or host. After getting an outline of the problem as it stands today, I asked Tom what might help differentiate “Enterprise WordPress” as a collective or entire ecosystem of agencies operating within it. Can open-source values of sharing and cooperation shape a unique global identity for enterprise WordPress agencies? Is it time for an inter-agency association or “guild” to take on these challenges?

Estimated reading time: 8 minutes

Transcript

Tom Willmot has been a WordPress pioneer and leader in the agency space since co-founding Human Made in 2010. Just in the past year, Human Made has more than doubled its size with a team of 100. Tom is also CEO and co-founder of Altis DXP, Human Made's enterprise WordPress digital experience platform. I caught up with Tom this week to find out what he's thinking about the challenges and opportunities of the enterprise market for WordPress agencies today.

Sparked by Magne Ilsaas‘s ideas in The WordPress Enterprise Paradox, Tom started a Twitter thread and hosted a live discussion this week about the challenges of not having a well-defined brand and market for enterprise WordPress. In the minds of clients beyond the WordPress and open-source community not to mention unhelpful tech industry analysts, “WordPress” is something you can buy, and it's often confused with any number of related brands: Automattic, WordPress VIP, and managed WordPress hosts that support enterprise clients.

After getting an outline of the problem as it stands today, I asked Tom what might help differentiate “Enterprise WordPress” as a collective or entire ecosystem of agencies operating within it. Can open-source values of sharing and cooperation shape a unique global identity for enterprise WordPress agencies? Is it time for an inter-agency association or “guild” to take on these challenges? (Human Made has an internal “guild” structure of cross-functional teams — what could it look like to extend them across the whole agency space?)

And how might that look within the WordPress ecosystem and others adjacent to it? Are more inter-agency gatherings needed along with greater participation in existing tech and design conferences? Will agencies like Human Made resume hosting conferences like their Day and Week of REST events in the past? Can the larger WordCamps cater to an enterprise track? Does Enterprise WordPress need its own conferences? I like Jeremy Keith and ClearLeft as a model for agency thought leadership. Magne has pointed to the Society of Digital Agencies (SoDA) as a model for organized peer collaboration and North Patrol as a model for a research and advisory firm that connects agencies with clients and reports on regional enterprise web tech markets.

This is an open, ongoing conversation. If it piques your interest, connect with Tom on Twitter.

🔗 Mentioned in the show:

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The Post Status Draft podcast is geared toward WordPress professionals, with interviews, news, and deep analysis. 📝

Browse our archives, and don’t forget to subscribe via iTunes, Google Podcasts, YouTube, Stitcher, Simplecast, or RSS. 🎧

Transcript

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Dan Knauss at November 18, 2022 04:30 PM under WordPress.org

Do The Woo Community: A Sneak Peak into Do the Woo 4.0, Supporting Contributors

In a recent podcast I gave a bit more insights to what you will be seeing with out newest update in early 2023.

>> The post A Sneak Peak into Do the Woo 4.0, Supporting Contributors appeared first on Do the Woo - a WooCommerce Builder Community .

by BobWP at November 18, 2022 10:27 AM under WooBits

Post Status: WordPress Tech Roundup for the Week of November 14

Learn Accessibility • The Return of SmashingConf • PHP 8.2 Release Delayed • Deno for Decoupled Front-End Development • LogoIpsum, Post to Telegram, and WP .gitgnore • Substack, the WordPress Plugin • Cool Tool: Restrict With Stripe

Estimated reading time: 8 minutes

Learn Accessibility

Digital accessibility, commonly abbreviated a11y, is an important subject in web developer circles. More and more, folks are looking for solid guidance on designing and building websites and web apps that disabled people can interact with in a meaningful and equivalent way.

Fortunately, thanks to Carie Fisher, with input and review from Alexandra White and Rachel Andrew, web developers can now take the free Learn Accessibility course at web.dev.

This course is for beginner and advanced web developers. You can go through the series from start to finish to get a general understanding of accessibility practices and testing, or you can use it as a reference for specific subjects.


The Return of SmashingConf

Front-end developers rejoice, the yearly SmashingConf hosted by the folks at Smashing Magazine is back in 2023!

SmashingConf has two events this year: one in San Fransisco, US, and one in Freiburg, Germany.

SmashingConf SF will cover everything from accessibility and advanced CSS to JavaScript gems and web performance, while SmashingConf Freiburg is all about front-end, UX, and design. 


PHP 8.2 Release Delayed

Due to some critical bugs related to OPcache that “are very likely to happen in a real-world use case” the PHP release managers have decided to add another PHP 8.2.0 RC and push back the final 8.2.0 release to December 8, 2022.

With the fast pace at which new PHP releases have been coming out, it’s good to remember that early testing of release candidates is critical to solid releases. 


Deno for Headless WordPress Themes

In a recent blog post on the Deno website, the team announced support for building WordPress themes using the Fresh framework as a front end for headless (or decoupled) WordPress. 

Deno is a runtime for JavaScript, TypeScript, and WebAssembly that is based on the V8 JavaScript engine and the Rust programming language. Created by Ryan Dahl, the creator of the Node.js runtime, Deno aims to address some of Dahl’s regrets about the initial design decisions with Node.js.

With the increased popularity of headless WordPress, this is an interesting entry into the space.


Substack, the WordPress Plugin

Ben Thompson’s Stratechery was a Substack inspiration and has always run on WordPress, but did you know Substack started as a WordPress product?


LogoIpsum, Post to Telegram, and WP .gitgnore

Cool Tool: Restrict With Stripe

Each week we feature one cool tool that can help make your life easier as a WordPress builder.

Stranger Studios quietly launched a new e-commerce plugin for WordPress a few weeks ago: Restrict With Stripe. If you love Stripe, it's for you. It connects to Stripe and lets you restrict a post, page, category, or tag by product so visitors must have purchased that product (or subscription) to get access to the restricted content. That's it.

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Jonathan Bossenger at November 18, 2022 10:00 AM under WordPress.com

WPTavern: Jetpack Search Adds Free Tier and 3-Month Free Trial

Jetpack Search, a plugin that enhances WordPress’ search capabilities, has added a free tier and a three-month free trial to what was previously only available as a paid upgrade. The plugin uses WordPress.com’s infrastructure to provide instant, more relevant search results without reloading the page, with real-time indexing, integration with WooCommerce, spelling correction, and more.

Jetpack Search was launched as a standalone plugin earlier this year but the user base hasn’t grown beyond a couple hundred active installs. The new free tier and free trials enable prospective customers to try out the functionality on their sites before committing to a new annual subscription.

Free users are limited to 5k records (all posts, pages, and other types of content the site indexes) and 500 requests (every time a visitor searches for something on the site) per month. Sites that go over the limits will not be cut off for the first three months.

At 10K records, pricing starts at $8.25/month, billed annually, and includes 10k requests, priority support, and unbranded search. When purchasing, Jetpack estimates the size of the site, but users who are not sure how many records they have can sign onto the free tier to find out.

The previous pricing for Jetpack Search started at $2.50 per month (billed annually) for up to 100 records. The plugin’s support docs explain why Jetpack implemented this major pricing change:

  1. Many folks were only looking for Search and did not want to also be paying for features they didn’t need.
  2. Allowing an unlimited number of records felt unfair because it was preventing us from offering lower prices or making improvements. Our operating costs for a site with one million posts are much higher than for a site with one thousand posts, but both sites were paying the same amount. We also wanted to offer users a free option so that they can experience how great Jetpack Search is before making a commitment to buy.

Jetpack assured existing search customers that the new pricing will not yet affect them until their plan renews and Automattic will contact them by email before the pricing changes.

Jetpack Search is built on top of Elasticsearch, and currently uses version 7.16, which is Elastic’s proprietary offering after the company abandoned its open source licensing. As a consequence, Amazon forked Elasticsearch and Kibana at version 7.10 to create the OpenSearch project.

“We built our own solution on top of it. We use Elasticsearch to build Jetpack Search, but we also use a lot of our other systems, especially Jetpack Stats, to provide great search relevancy that you can’t get by just deploying Elasticsearch,” Jetpack Marketing Lead Rob Pugh said.

“We are running both OpenSearch and Elasticsearch for different services but Jetpack Search is on ES. We’ll continue to consider both in the future.”

by Sarah Gooding at November 18, 2022 03:40 AM under Jetpack Search

November 17, 2022

Post Status: Two Tools

Jetpack and WordPress.com can publish to Telegram.

The ultimate gitignore for WordPress projects.

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Dan Knauss at November 17, 2022 09:37 PM under WordPress.com

Post Status: Are WebP and SVG Pixels Greener?

As a followup to my note in August on this topic, here's what Tom Greenwood had to say about WebP's value to sustainability in WordPress:

I think as most browsers support WebP now, there is a real benefit to serving this format as it saves a lot on data transfer and improves performance. The downside perhaps is that most images are uploaded as JPG and pretty much all implementations that I have seen will then generate the WebP files as duplicates, so there is unfortunately an increase in data storage. I think the trade-off is worth it though.

As for SVG, these can be way more efficient in terms of both data storage and transfer compared to JPG or WebP, but of course they should be well optimised, and I'm not sure of an automated way to do that, so there is more hands on work there. The downside here is that complex SVG files could cause more CPU energy to be used on the end user's device, so the simpler the design and more optimised the files the better.

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Dan Knauss at November 17, 2022 05:46 PM under WebP

Post Status: Pandemic experiences, “Are you disabled?” and the history of screen readers

Back in July, Sabina Ionescu published a lot of different responses from people in the WordPress community to questions about the impact of the pandemic on them. I missed it then, but it's still relevant and worth reading.

Some other things I've enjoyed but haven't slipped into a post yet:

Joanne Limburg discusses the agonizing and awful, inadequate disability/disabled questions that come with job applications, government forms, etc.:

Do you consider yourself to be a disabled person?

Yes: No: Prefer not to say:

The history of screen readers is incredible! Sheon Han tells their hidden story and how “blind programmers have been creating the tools their community needs” — for decades.

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Dan Knauss at November 17, 2022 02:34 PM under WordPress.com

Do The Woo Community: Piccia Neri, a Rocking Good UX Designer Passionate About Accessibility

Piccia is passionate about good UX, and in this show offers some great user experience insights into both WordPress and WooCommerce sites.

>> The post Piccia Neri, a Rocking Good UX Designer Passionate About Accessibility appeared first on Do the Woo - a WooCommerce Builder Community .

by BobWP at November 17, 2022 10:33 AM under UX

Post Status: Patchstack enriches open vulnerability data with signals showing attack volume, method, and source

Back in August, Oliver Sild announced in Post Status Slack that Patchstack was opening up “additional data” to “enrich the vulnerability data” their service discloses, now “with [a] real-time IP feed of attackers who hit [Patchstack's] virtual patches.”

Virtual patches are Patchstack's quick interventions for customers' sites when an official patch doesn't exist yet for a newly disclosed vulnerability. In Oliver's words, they are “security rules that protect from specific plugin/theme/core vulnerabilities.” So, if someone is actually hitting these virtual patches, it's very likely they are trying to probe or exploit a vulnerability.

Since the large number of sites being protected by Patchstack's virtual patches makes a very big (but impenetrable) attack surface for new vulnerabilities and zero-day attacks, it makes a perfect attack monitoring network — or possibly even a honeypot for attackers. The data Patchstack can get from hits to their patches “gives more context to all vulnerabilities.” In other words, they can see if a particular vulnerability is being targeted heavily — or not at all. Then they can prioritize the attention of their security network partners and “fight fearmongering (i.e low severity plugins that get to media, but we all know are not exploited).”

Oliver breaks down the details:

We create those virtual patches on a daily basis for all new security vulnerabilities that we add to the Patchstack Database and protect a very large number of sites globally. That gives us an accurate coverage of both small and big attack campaigns targeting WordPress sites and plugins, but more importantly — we are often able to identify the attackers and their new methods first. The cool thing is that since our virtual patches cause no false positives, the same quality applies to our IP threat feed.

This is cool indeed! WordPress security could go on the offensive with information like this and shut down attackers with the help of hosting partners.

Patchstack is going to publicly release the actual attack levels for each vulnerability in their database, “but for anyone who needs such data in bulk (to apply on their entire hosting infrastructure or to network firewalls), here’s some more information already: https://patchstack.com/for-hosts/

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Dan Knauss at November 17, 2022 05:00 AM under WCEU

WPTavern: Loudness: A New Block Theme from Automattic

Automattic has released a new block theme called Loudness that is available on both WordPress.com and WordPress.org. It’s an artistic and opinionated theme based on the company’s Block Canvas starter theme. Although Loudness’ brief description suggests the theme was created for “music and learning,” the design and custom patterns lend themselves to a variety of different use cases. It could easily be used to whip up a quick event website with ticketing, an artist’s portfolio, or even a personal blog.

Loudness’ typography features the energetic combination of the sans-serif Rubik font for headers and DM Mono for paragraph text. The type design and font development for DM Mono was commissioned from Colophon Foundry, an award-winning type foundry based in London.

Installing and activating the theme on a fresh website offers users a good experience, as it automatically puts everything in the design in place exactly like the live demo on WordPress.com. Users don’t have to figure out which patterns to add in order to get it looking like the demo.

Loudness packages 12 custom block patterns, which can be previewed on WordPress.org. The pattern organization in this theme could be improved, as Loudness’ patterns are intermixed with selections from the pattern directory. It’s not easy to differentiate which ones belong to the theme. For purists who like to use only the patterns included in the theme to keep the design tight, it’s much easier when a theme creates a custom label in the pattern explorer for its own patterns.

Not pictured in the demo is a full-width FAQ pattern with a dark color scheme, which matches the other quirky design elements in the theme.

In addition to the instructors pattern and pricing table shown in the demo, Loudness includes artistic designs for a pullquote pattern and a section of large text.

Two illustrations are included for use in the header area or to break up the design. They can easily be swapped out for a photo or a custom illustration from another source.

Loudness doesn’t include any style variations, likely because most of the patterns are highly dependent on the established color palette. Although users are free to alter it in the Site Editor, the results may not be as harmonious as expected when using the illustrations in the site design.

Loudness is a unique block theme that makes a strong impression and can be creatively applied to many different types of websites – from events to blogs to businesses and agencies. The theme is available for free from WordPress.org and is also available to users on WordPress.com.

by Sarah Gooding at November 17, 2022 01:47 AM under free wordpress themes

Post Status: Catching up with Do the Woo

Bob puts out so much writing and audio at Do the Woo and has so many different people featured, it's hard to keep up! These are some recent ones I've taken note of but didn't get into a post or newsletter. Definitely worth a listen:

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Dan Knauss at November 17, 2022 12:29 AM under Zach Stepek

November 16, 2022

Post Status: Naming is hard—but important

This is an important topic that came out of a Post Status Slack #security discussion involving Robert Rowley and John James Jacoby: WordPress Terminology Meta. It continued over at the WPwatercooler.

This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Dan Knauss at November 16, 2022 09:17 PM under WPwatercooler

Post Status: WordPress 6.1.1 • Team Rep Nominations • Codespaces for Contributions

This Week at WordPress.org (November 14, 2022)

Time to update, WordPress 6.1.1 is out! GitHub has made Codespaces available for 60 hours/month, and WordPress is exploring Core contribution integrations with wordpress/wordpress-develop. It's team rep nomination time too.

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This article was published at Post Status — the community for WordPress professionals.

by Courtney Robertson at November 16, 2022 07:36 PM under WordPress.org

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November 28, 2022 02:15 AM
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